Post Tagged with: "money"

Negative interest rates are just a tax on reserves that lowers net interest margins

Negative interest rates are just a tax on reserves that lowers net interest margins

The primacy of monetary policy continues unabated as central banks go further and further down the rat hole of increasingly desperate measures to boost demand. First, it was quantitative easing. Now, the latest scheme is negative interest rates. They tell us that monetary policy is not exhausted and that still more policy initiatives lie ahead, particularly helicopter money. However, we should be sceptical that any of these policies will gain meaningful traction before another economic downturn. Brief comments below

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Why Understanding Money Matters in Greece

Why Understanding Money Matters in Greece

As Greece staggers under the weight of a depression exceeding that of the 1930s in the US, it appears difficult to see a way forward from what is becoming increasingly a Ponzi financed, extend and pretend, “bailout” scheme. In fact, there are much more creative and effective ways to solve some of the macrofinancial dilemmas that Greece is facing, and without Greece having to exit the euro. But these solutions challenge many existing economic paradigms, including the concept of “money” itself.

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Endogenous Money in the Media

Last night, we aired two segments on endogenous money on Boom Bust, the TV show I am now producing on RT, the Russian broadcaster. Frances Coppola and Cullen Roche do a good job of explaining the details. Take a look

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On the persistence of inadequate ideas like the money multiplier

On the persistence of inadequate ideas like the money multiplier

I have been saying for years now that the money multiplier does not adequately explain how money is created in a modern fiat money economy. In particular, the idea that banks are passive intermediaries who simply respond to injections of central bank money by creating more loans is fundamentally wrong. Banks actively determine the amount of “inside money” circulating in the economy. When they create loans or buy securities, inside money increases. When loans are repaid or written off, or securities are sold, inside money reduces. The constraints on bank lending are multiple and complex, and don’t include reserve availability (though the price of reserves is a constraint). The Bank of England’s description of the process is broadly accurate.

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Interest rates and deflation

Interest rates and deflation

By Frances Coppola Scott Sumner argues that when the monetary base is fixed, low interest rates are deflationary. I’ve emphasised the fixed monetary base because it is an important condition. If the monetary base is NOT fixed then the relationship between low interest rates and deflation is much less clear. Logically, this makes sense. If the supply of base money […]

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How money matters: The Old Lady fails to get an “A”

How money matters: The Old Lady fails to get an “A”

Andrea Terzi Dr. Terzi is a Professor of Economics at Franklin University Switzerland and a Research Associate with the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College. One thing’s for sure: The financial crisis has dealt a deadly blow to what was until recently considered the state-of-the-art of monetary policy. Just compare the 1992 edition of Modern Money Mechanics, published by the […]

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The BoE’s sharp shock to monetary illusions

The BoE’s sharp shock to monetary illusions

I’m doffing my cap to the researchers at Threadneedle Street for a new paper “Money creation in the modern economy,” which gives a truly realistic explanation of how money is created, why this really matters, and why virtually everything that economic textbooks say about money is wrong. The bank is going gangbusters to get its message across, with an introductory paper on what money is, and two short videos on what money is and money creation, both shot in its gold vault. It clearly wants economic textbooks to throw out the neat, plausible but wrong rubbish they currently teach about money, and connect with the real world instead.

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A few insights on Japan and thoughts about wealth confiscation and default

A few insights on Japan and thoughts about wealth confiscation and default

Abenomics is one of the most aggressive economic experiments we have witnessed in the post-Marshall Plan developed world. The questions is whether the massive stimulus campaign can work when politically there will always be discomfort with the large deficits at the heart of the campaign. Deficit reduction is now coming online via tax increases. Below are some threads on what is happening in Japan as this occurs.

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Some brief thoughts on Bitcoin

Some brief thoughts on Bitcoin

2013 has been a breakout year for Bitcoin, the virtual payment system. I haven’t written anything on it to date but I have been following the market. Here are some ideas on Bitcoin based on what I have seen.

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Malinvestment and the endogeneity of money

Malinvestment and the endogeneity of money

So much has been written about the endogeneity of money that I thought it was now widely accepted. But recent exchanges have shown me that people STILL aren’t getting it. Most recently, there have been two themes doing the rounds that bother me: – malinvestment is caused by a growing money supply; the presence of excess reserves in the system indicates a growing money supply (and therefore malinvestment). Both are wrong.

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Five reasons the Fed’s taper will begin in September

Five reasons the Fed’s taper will begin in September

Sober look argues that little doubt remains at this stage that the Fed will begin slowing its securities purchases this September. The central bank under Bernanke’s leadership has been highly focused on data and will consider the following 5 broad indicators to reach its decision.

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Chart of the day: Does this violate key principles of money creation?

Chart of the day: Does this violate key principles of money creation?

In spite of the divergence in the chart, the “loans create deposits” axiom still stands – deposits are still created through bank credit. Two key developments explain much of this divergence without violating these principles.

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