Post Tagged with: "monetary policy"

UK interest rate dissenter signals policy divergence may be coming to an end

As expected, the Bank of England left rates unchanged at a record low 0.25% in today’s Monetary Policy Committee decision. There was a dissent, however, with soon to be departing MPC member Kristin Forbes wanting a quarter-point rise.

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Some thoughts on systematic central bank policy errors

A recent post by Matthew Klein on central banks over at FT Alphaville that dovetails with some of the themes I have been writing about here at Credit Writedowns for the past decades is what preciputated this post. Let me summarize my thesis and tell you why it matters. Here are the bullet points – focused here mostly on the US.

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The yield curve is still flatter than at anytime since the last recession

The yield curve is still flatter than at anytime since the last recession

If you look at the difference in yield between 2 and 10-year treasuries, the numbers in the last year are the lowest since 2008, when the US economy was in a recession.

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Underconsumption and the end of excess demand

Yesterday’s post on the failure of Japan’s monetary policy experiment drew some favourable commentary from a prominent macroeconomist that I want to run by you. The gist of his insight is that we have long been living in an age of an excess supply which is only now being made plain. Let me run the tenor of his comments by you and make some additional ones of my own.

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Why Japan’s monetary experiment has failed and what it means for everyone else

Yesterday’s most interesting headline in the Wall Street Journal was “The World’s Most Radical Experiment in Monetary Policy Isn’t Working”. After reading it, the right questions to ask are “why isn’t the policy working?” and “what does this mean for the global economy?”. Here are my answers.

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The dollar bull market will eventually break something

The dollar bull market will eventually break something

With the fed having raised interest rates for the second time in ten years, in an environment in which US growth looks pretty good, we should expect more hikes to come. The question is whether the economy can withstand the hikes and what they would mean for markets. I have five asset classes to watch: Treasuries, the US Dollar, Emerging Markets, the Japanese Yen, and Gold.

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Monetary policy is at the end of the line

Monetary policy is at the end of the line

The last few days have made clear that monetary policy is having less and less impact as time goes along.In particular, the latest salvos from the Bank of Japan smack of desperation, as if BOJ Governor Kuroda has decided to throw everything but the kitchen sink into his grab bag of unorthodox monetary policy. Because the Bank of Japan is so far along the curve toward both secular stagnation and unorthodox policy to counteract that slowing, we should pay attention to how their experiments go. I do not expect good results.

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Upbeat macro thoughts as Fed’s Jackson Hole Symposium begins

Upbeat macro thoughts as Fed’s Jackson Hole Symposium begins

I haven’t posted much recently – mostly because there haven’t been many developments economically that change my macro view. We still live in a slow growth world, where recession is not the base case n the US, the UK, or the eurozone. And none of the data we have seen in the last few weeks has changed that path.

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Re-calibrating our thinking about Brexit after MPC rate cut

Re-calibrating our thinking about Brexit after MPC rate cut

The Bank of England has cut interest rates and started a quantitative easing program that includes both government and corporate bonds. This approach was enough to send the pound Sterling down to $1.31 and 10-year gilt rates to a record low of 0.677%. While I reiterate my previous bullish views on Anglo-Saxon long rates, US dollar strength and on the UK […]

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UK fiscal and monetary policy offset to kick in, bullish for gilts

UK fiscal and monetary policy offset to kick in, bullish for gilts

UK Chancellor Osborne has now abandoned his 2020 budget surplus target. Combine this with the dovish statements by Bank of England governor Mark Carney yesterday and you can see some serious policy changes in play to minimize the near-term downside risk. But, of course the risks to the UK are longer-term and the near-term risks are mostly elsewhere in the global economy. I continue to believe this favours safe assets i.e. government bonds.

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Expansions that didn’t die in their beds but were murdered by the Federal Reserve

Expansions that didn’t die in their beds but were murdered by the Federal Reserve

I’ve been following the Fed’s forward guidance recently and, frankly, I find it confused. On the one hand, it was a clear mistake to have raised rates in December. We see this now in retrospect due to the tightening of financial conditions that policy divergence , a strong dollar and the collapse of oil prices had wrought in January and February. The Fed recognized the shift and backpedaled on its ‘promise’ of 300 basis points of rate hikes through 2018. But, now that financial conditions have eased, the Fed is back to talking up rate hikes yet again – this, despite a flattening yield curve.

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The new normal that never was

The new normal that never was

The extended period of low growth following the Global Crisis was denoted the ‘New Normal’ by some. This column argues that the period is still ongoing, and would be more usefully described as the ‘New Abnormal’. Far from being an equilibrium, the low growth was achieved by progressively more aggressive and unprecedented monetary policy actions, in response to a series of financial panics. Furthermore, the aftershocks of the Crisis are still colliding with a series of profound structural changes to and instabilities in the global economy.

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