Chart of the Day: U.S. Payroll Employment By Industry, November 2011

By Global Macro Monitor

Related Posts
1 of 1,553

Here’s what the BLS had to say about this morning’s employment report:

Subscribe to our newsletter

In November, nonfarm payroll employment rose by 120,000. Employment continued to trend up in retail trade, leisure and hospitality, professional and business services, and health care. Government employment continued to trend down.

The increase in total nonfarm payroll employment in November (120,000) was in line with the average gain for the prior 12 months (+131,000). The private sector added 140,000 jobs, as employment rose in a number of service-providing industries.

Employment in retail trade rose by 50,000 in November, with much of the increase occurring in clothing and clothing accessories stores and in electronics and appliance stores. Since reaching an employment trough in December 2009, retailers have added an average of 14,000 jobs per month.

Employment in professional and business services continued to trend up in November (+33,000). Modest job gains continued in temporary help services.

Health care employment (part of education and health services) continued to rise in November (+17,000). Over the past 12 months, health care has added an average of 27,000 jobs per month.

Employment in leisure and hospitality continued to trend up in November (+22,000). In the last 12 months, leisure and hospitality added 253,000 jobs, largely driven by employment increases in food services and drinking places.

Construction employment showed little movement in November. Employment in the industry has shown little change, on net, since early 2010.

Government employment continued to trend down in November, with a decline in the U.S. Postal Service. Employment in both state government and local government has been trending down since the second half of 2008.

Get real time updates directly on you device, subscribe now.

Comments are closed.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More